Woman awarded $29m in damages in Johnson & Johnson cancer case

Woman awarded $29m in damages in Johnson & Johnson cancer case

"We are disappointed with today's verdict and will pursue an appeal because Johnson's Baby Powder does not contain asbestos or cause cancer", the statement says.

Wednesday's ruling also comes about a year after 22 women were awarded $4.7 billion from the company after they claimed the company's products caused them to develop ovarian cancer.

This is the latest development in over 13,000 lawsuits the company is facing across the US. The jury decided against awarding punitive damages, which are created to punish the defendants - in this case Johnson & Johnson and the other companies involved in making the talcum powder - for reckless or negligent behavior.

A California jury returned a $29.4 million verdict in a trial involving a woman who believes that her mesothelioma is tied to her regular use of Johnson & Johnson's talcum powder. We respect the legal process and reiterate that jury verdicts are not medical, scientific or regulatory conclusions about a product.

Plaintiff Teresa Leavitt is a mother of two who said J&J's talc products were used on her as a child, and she used it herself into adulthood, Bloomberg reports.

The company has insisted that its talc-based products are demonstrably safe but it has lost a string of court cases.

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"Yet another jury has rejected J&J's misleading claims that its talc was free of asbestos", Leavitt's lawyer, Moshe Maimon, said in a statement Wednesday, slamming the "decades of cover-up, deception and concealment by J&J".

"Hundreds of internal J&J documents showed the truth that it has been hiding for years". A company executive in the 1970s warned that J&J's talc mines might not be free of asbestos.

In December, Reuters published an in-depth investigation that showed Johnson & Johnson knew its baby powder occasionally tested positive for small amounts of asbestos and covered up the findings.

Despite the verdicts, Johnson & Johnson maintains that its baby powder formula does not contain asbestos, and set up a website called "Facts about Talc" to try and dissuade the public from continuing to think one of its most popular products contains the harmful mineral.

California Superior Court Judge Brad Seligman, who oversaw the trial, told jurors in February that the company was no longer part of the case after it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection under the weight of the talc litigation, which stayed lawsuits against it.

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