House Votes for Russia Investigation Final Report Be Public

House Votes for Russia Investigation Final Report Be Public

"Attorney General Barr said he wants to be transparent with Congress and the public consistent with the rules and the law", Rep. Douglas Collins, R-Ga., the Judiciary Committee's ranking member, said on the House floor Thursday, adding that the resolution was "simply a restatement of the regulation".

The House on Thursday morning passed a nonbinding resolution urging special counsel Robert Mueller's report to be released to the public and Congress.

The top Republican on the House judiciary panel, Georgia congressman Doug Collins, voted for the resolution but said it was unnecessary.

Current law states that the Mueller Report must be turned over to the attorney general, in this case the Trump-appointed AG, William Barr.

The resolution cites "an overwhelming public interest" in releasing the report "to ensure public confidence in both the process and the result of the investigation".

The resolution also calls for the report to be sent to Congress.

It's unclear if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will introduce the measure in his chamber.

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Excluding themselves from the bipartisan House consensus were four members, who instead chose to vote present: libertarians Rep. Justin Amash (Ky.) and Rep. Thomas Massie (Mich.), and President Donald Trump Republican loyalists Rep. Matt Gaetz (Fla.) and Paul Gosar (Ariz.). "It is important that Congress stand up for the principle of full transparency". Those regulations require only that the report explain decisions to pursue or to decline prosecutions, which could range from a bullet-point list to a report running hundreds of pages.

"I rise in support of this resolution because I want the whole truth and nothing but the truth to come to light in this matter", said Rep.

In introducing the resolution, Nadler and five other Democratic committee chairs said "the public is clearly served by transparency with respect to any investigation that could implicate or exonerate the president and his campaign". But he stopped short of giving a full-throated guarantee that the report would be made public.

But Democrats have said they are unsatisfied with Barr's answers and want a stronger commitment to releasing the full report, along with interview transcripts and other underlying evidence.

Democrats are anxious that Barr's strict defense of his own prerogative, combined with his stated respect for Justice Department rules advising against both the indictment of a sitting president or impugning an unindicted individual in an investigative report, means potential information implicating President Donald Trump in alleged wrongdoing could be buried.

But the effort did not move forward after Republican Sen.

In February, six House Democratic committee chairs, led by Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler of NY, made a similar request in a letter to Barr.

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