Toyota Wants 1.7 Million Vehicles Back Because Airbags Are ‘Potentially Deadly’

Toyota Wants 1.7 Million Vehicles Back Because Airbags Are ‘Potentially Deadly’

At least 23 people around the world have been killed and hundreds of more people have been injured, CBS News reported on January 9.

Toyota models included in the recall are the 2010 through 2016 4Runner, the 2010 through 2013 Corolla and Matrix, and the 2011 through 2014 Sienna.

The recall also involves Luxury Lexus models: ES 350 sedans (2010-2012), GX 460 SUVs (2010-2017), IS 250C and IS 350C convertibles (2010-2015), IS 250 and IS 350 sedans (2010-2013) and Lexus IS-F sedans (2010-2014). It also includes the 2010 to 2015 Scion XB.

Automakers are adding about 10 million vehicle inflators in the United States to what was already the largest-ever recall campaign in history.

The Takata airbag recall affects more than 100 million vehicles and almost 20 automotive brands around the world.

In February 2018, the recall of vehicles affected by the faulty Takata airbags was made compulsory under law, with affected manufacturers required to replace all defective airbags by the end of 2020.

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According to USA Today, the airbag inflators could explode on deployment and send shrapnel at passengers.

Auto owners who are affected by the recall will be notified via mail in January.

The most unsafe inflators are in areas of the South along the Gulf of Mexico that have high humidity.

Depending on the model, dealers will either replace the front passenger airbag inflator or airbag assembly for free.

The defect led Takata to file for bankruptcy protection in June 2017. Both automakers have urged some drivers of older vehicles not to drive them until the inflators are replaced.

People can check to see if their vehicles were recalled by going to https://www.toyota.com/recall or https://www.airbagrecall.com and putting in their license plate or vehicle identification numbers.

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