No Donald, French 'yellow vest' protesters were not chanting 'we want Trump'

No Donald, French 'yellow vest' protesters were not chanting 'we want Trump'

The so-called "yellow vest" protesters have still vowed to stage demonstrations alongside trade unions and farmers.Jacline Mouraud, the self-proclaimed spokesperson for the "yellow vests", told The Associated Press that Macron's move "is on the right path but in my opinion it will not fundamentally change the movement".

The "gilets jaunes" movement began as a protest against a rise in duties on diesel, which is widely used by French motorists and has always been less heavily taxed than other types of fuel.

When those consumers feel the pain, they take to the streets-more reliably in response to higher fuel or food prices than perhaps any other influence.

French protesters welcome Macron's decision to scrap the fuel tax rise planned for next year, but said it may not be enough to contain public anger.

In all, four people have been killed and hundreds injured in clashes or accidents stemming from the protests.

However, his policies have angered many French citizens who say he does not care about most of the people.

Polling showed that 70 percent of French residents opposed the measure, even after they elected Macron in a landslide previous year.

It was Prime Minister Edouard Philippe who announced a six-month delay in the fuel tax increase that was to have begun in January.

Protesters say Mr Macron is out of touch, particularly with non-city dwellers who rely on their cars.

Minister Francois de Rugy told BFM TV that the government had chose to ditch the plans in their entirety in order to assuage fears that the increase would be be reintroduced as soon as the protests came to an end.

Burned cars litter the streets of Paris following Saturday's unrest
Image Burned cars litter the streets of Paris following Saturday's unrest

Macron and Philippe's approval ratings hit new lows in the wake of the crisis. French officials said they are created to move the country away from fossil fuels and part of an effort to fight climate change.

Just three weeks ago, Philippe had insisted the government would be steadfast in the tax plans aimed at weaning French consumers off fossil fuels.

The "yellow vests" are largely made up of modest earners from rural and small-town France, and many want Macron's proposed tax cut for the richest repealed.

Demonstrators were back in the streets Tuesday wearing their signature yellow vests.

Nine government ministers were sent out to the television and radio studios Wednesday to explain the administration's stance.

Meanwhile, Total TOTF.PA said a rising number of its filling stations were running dry as a result of "yellow vest" road blocks. Violent rampaging last Saturday devastated the French capital.

Interior Minister Christophe Castaner said extra police would be deployed next Saturday on top of the 65,000 out in force last weekend, urging "reasonable" members of the movement to stay at home.

"Trump also retweeted a false claim from American conservative student activist Charlie Kirk that said: "'We want Trump' being chanted through the streets of Paris".

Two truck driver unions called an indefinite sympathy strike from Sunday night, and students are blocking dozens of schools nationwide to denounce tougher university entrance requirements.

Fuel shortages due to blockades remain a problem in areas of Brittany, Normandy and southeast regions of France.

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