Google shutting down Google+ after covering up privacy bug

Google shutting down Google+ after covering up privacy bug

The review found no misuse of the data and the problem was fixed in March, but the company's privacy and data protection office said the vulnerability didn't meet the threshold of security issues to notify users of the data breach.

Upon discovering the bug, Google patched it, but opted not to disclose it to the public out of fear of regulatory pressure and unfavorable comparisons to Facebook's Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal.

Google is shutting down its long-neglected Facebook competitor Google+ following the disclosure of a vulnerability that could have resulted in third-party developers accessing private data from around 500,000 users, the company announced Monday.

In addition to "sunsetting consumer Google+", the company is making changes to APIs on its other services, which will limit the amount of access developers get to data on Android and Gmail.

The company said it will give consumers more control over what data apps can access.

The company added that it made a decision to sunset the consumer version of Google+ due to the significant challenges in creating and maintaining it and its very low usage.

The consumer functionality of Google+ will be closing over a 10 month period, while Google transitions the product to be used internally by the Enterprise.

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Google is shutting down its much-maligned social network, Google+, after user data was exposed.

In announcing the closure, Google acknowledged that Google+ failed to gain significant traction with consumers.

Google says that 90 per cent of Google+ user sessions lasted for less than five seconds.

Sign in to your account at http://plus.google.com/downgrade and follow the instructions to delete your Google+ profile.

"We found no evidence that any developer was aware of this bug, or abusing the API, and we found no evidence that any profile data was misused", Smith said. According to market research company Statista, the Google platform does not feature anywhere in the top 20 list of most famous social media sites based on active users as of July 2018.

Google says that going forward, rather than bundling permissions together for a single approval, each and every permission requested by an app will be shown one at a time, within its own dialog box.

Project Strobe will also lead to Google account holders getting more fine-grained controls over the data they share with apps, which now have overly broad access to user information, Google said.

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