Serena Williams vs Julia Goerges, Wimbledon 2018 semi-final

Serena Williams vs Julia Goerges, Wimbledon 2018 semi-final

The first two points played by Ostapenko - who won the French Open in 2017 and crashed out in the first round the following year - were emblematic of the match. But when she's bad, she can be horrid. Goerges, reduced to hit 13% of her groundstrokes inside the baseline, much less than the average 37% registered in their previous rounds, had to survive a huge, constant pressure from the back and her hopes to play the second all-German major final (Aussem won the only previous one at 1931 Wimbledon over Kranwinkel) faded. She was spraying balls.

When Williams left the game soon after claiming her 23rd Grand Slam at the 2017 Australian Open, it appeared her streak might be under threat.

The Duchess of Sussex will cheer on Serena Williams who has reached her 10th Wimbledon women's singles final - just ten months after almost dying during childbirth.

The left-handed Kerber was mainly a passive participant in the early going against Ostapenko.

That enjoyment was clear to see as she dashed Goerges's hopes of setting up an all-German final with Angelique Kerber in 70 unforgiving minutes.

The youngest remaining player in the draw, 21-year-old Ostapenko was a junior champion at Wimbledon in 2014 and has gone one step further than when she reached the quarterfinals at the All England club a year ago. That first game consisted of eight points: Three were unforced errors by Ostapenko, including a double-fault to begin the proceedings; the other five were winners by her, including a 100 miles per hour ace to close the hold. That first game consisted of eight points: Three were unforced errors by Ostapenko, including a double-fault to begin the proceedings; the other five were winners by her, including a 100 miles per hour ace to close the hold.

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Times have changed, opponents have come and gone, and Serena Williams keeps vying for Grand Slam titles. She had 14 winners and 10 unforced errors, while Kerber had three winners and - this was key - zero unforced errors.

All of the time away pushed someone who's spent more than 300 weeks ranked No. 1 down the rankings - she began Wimbledon at 181st, but was seeded 25th on account of her past success - and no one could quite be sure how the American would fare over these two weeks. Williams broke for a 4-2 lead in the second when Goerges tried a rare drop shot that caught the top of the net tape and fell on her side.

After having Princess Charlotte in May 2015, the Duchess's maternity leave lasted six months and it was expected to be the same length of time for her third child.

If she wins on Saturday, Williams will become the first to lift the Venus Rosewater Dish since Goolagong triumphed 38 years ago.

It took Kerber two tries to serve out the victory, getting broken to 5-2.

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