Uber Won't Force Sexual Misconduct Survivors Into Arbitration Anymore

Uber Won't Force Sexual Misconduct Survivors Into Arbitration Anymore

The company is ending the controversial practice of forced arbitration for all of its employees, riders, and drivers, reports CNBC.

Uber's ride-hailing service will give its USA passengers and drivers more leeway to pursue claims of sexual misconduct, its latest attempt to reverse its reputation for brushing aside bad behavior.

The new policy is one of a number of changes made by new CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who also is tightening driver screenings and enhancing its app so customers can have more trusted contacts able to follow each trip and a new emergency button that automatically dials 911.

Uber says it's putting safety at the core of everything it does. Uber also did away with a clause requiring people who settle such claims with Uber to sign a nondisclosure agreement that would forbid them from speaking about their experience.

In early December, a bipartisan group of U.S. senatorsintroduced legislation to Congress that would void forced arbitration agreements in workplaces that silence victims of sexual harassment. "I want to thank (CNN) for the reporting that you've done on this issue".

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While scandals at Uber's corporate offices have taken center stage, the company has also faced plenty of other well-publicized harassment and assault allegations from members of its ride-hailing platform. In March 2018, Uber came under fire after court records showed it had tried to push the women in that case toward individual arbitration. "We hope to open-source this methodology so we can encourage others in the ridesharing, transportation and travel industries, both private and public, to join us in taking this step". That includes investigations into the possible use of illegal software to monitor competitors and even disrupt efforts to regulate the ride-sharing service.

"I will tell you that, when this data is actually published as part of the safety transparency report, I think those numbers are going to be disturbing", said West.

Last month, Susan Fowler, the former Uber engineer who authored a 2017 viral blog post about sexual harassment she endured while working there, penned an op-ed for the New York Times on how to terminate such behavior.

Uber has to formally decide by Wednesday whether it will require the women in the proposed class action suit to carry out their assault claims in forced arbitration.

"As bold and far reaching as this announcement and decision is, and as unique as it is, it won't give everything to everybody", West said, noting that the arbitration change around harassment and assault don't apply in class action suits.

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